Gravity 5: Putting Einstein in the Navigator’s Seat

by Shane L. Larson

When Einstein put general relativity forward in 1915, the world had barely entered into the electrical era. Automobiles were not unheard of, but were not common. The great Russian rocket pioneer, Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, had published the first analysis of rocket flight through space in 1903, but the first successful liquid fueled rocket would not be flown until 1926 by American rocket engineer, Robert H. Goddard, reaching an altitude of just 41 feet. Earth gravity, though weak by the standards of general relativity, was a formidable foe. Of what possible use was general relativity?

The great rocket pioneers  Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (L) and Robert H. Goddard (R). They were actively trying to design machines to escape Earth's weak gravity at a time when Einstein was developing general relativity to understand gravity in more extreme situations.

The great rocket pioneers Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (L) and Robert H. Goddard (R). They were actively trying to design machines to escape Earth’s weak gravity at a time when Einstein was developing general relativity to understand gravity in more extreme situations.

At the time general relativity was first described, it was very much in the form of what is today called “fundamental research.” It described Nature on the deepest levels. It extended the boundaries of human knowledge. It challenged our conceptions about how the Cosmos was put together. But for all practical purposes, it had little impact on the average person. It did not contribute to the Technological Revolution, electrifying the world and changing the face of industrial manufacturing. It did not provide a reliable way to make crossing the Atlantic faster or safer. It did not transform the way steel was made or assembly lines were automated. It did not make the lives of the common worker easier, nor scintillate the conversations around family dinner tables.

Chicago in 1915, when general relativity was first presented. South State Street (L) and Water Street (R). Horses were still common, electricity was just coming to cities, and buildings were short by today's standards. General relativity was "fundamental research" and, at the time, had little direct bearing on everyday life.

Chicago in 1915, when general relativity was first presented. South State Street (L) and Water Street (R). Horses were still common, electricity was just coming to cities, and buildings were short by today’s standards. General relativity was “fundamental research” and, at the time, had little direct bearing on everyday life.

In fact, the implications and predictions of general relatively were not fully understood in those early years. It has taken a full century to come to grips with what it is telling us about the structure of the Universe. Over time, it has slowly become a prominent tool to understand astrophysics and cosmology, but those applications are still the purview of exploratory, fundamental science.  It is only now, after a century of tinkering and deep thinking that the full potential of general relativity is being realized. Today, it impacts the lives of every one of us through the magic devices we carry in our pockets that tag our photos with the locations they were taken and help us navigate to business meetings and ice cream shops. Virtually every phone and handheld electronic device in use today uses global positioning system technology (GPS), which cannot work without a full and deep understanding of general relativity.

How do you navigate around the world? When I was a youngster, I would go to camp in the Rocky Mountains every summer. Those long ago days were filled with all manner of woodland adventures, ranging from ropes courses, to archery, to cliff jumping into swimming holes. My favorite activity, however, was hiking and navigating. We tromped all over the forests and mountainsides of Colorado, and every now and then stopped to pinpoint our location on a paper map of the forest. It was an activity that agreed well with me, instilling a lifelong love of maps.  So how did it work?

Traditional navigation using a compass and map. (L) The direction to multiple known landmarks is measured with a compass. (R) Those directions are transferred to a map, passing through the landmark. The place where the sightlines cross is your location.

Traditional navigation using a compass and map. (L) The direction to multiple known landmarks is measured with a compass. (R) Those directions are transferred to a map, passing through the landmark. The place where the sightlines cross is your location.

The basic notion of navigation on paper is to recognize some landmarks around you — perhaps two distinct mountain peaks in the distance.  Let’s call them “Mount Einstein” and “Mount Newton.”  Using your compass, you determine the direction from your location to each of the mountain peaks. Perhaps Mount Einstein is due northwest, and Mount Newton is north-northwest (a hiking compass is finely graded into 360 degrees, so you could have more precise numerical values for direction; the procedure is the same one I describe here with cardinal directions).

Now, you go to your paper map, and locate the two mountain features you are looking at. When you find Mount Einstein, you draw a line on your map that goes through Mount Einstein, pointing due northwest. If you are standing anywhere along that line, you will see Mount Einstein due northwest.  Now you do the same thing with Mount Newton, drawing a line that points due north-northwest. If you are standing anywhere along this line, then you will see Mount Newton due north-northwest.  If you extend your two lines as far as you can, you will see they cross at one place and one place only. This is the only place a person can stand and see these two landmarks in the directions indicated — it happens to be exactly where you are standing!

In the modern era, many of us navigate using GPS technology, built directly into our smartphones.

In the modern era, many of us navigate using GPS technology, built directly into our smartphones.

This navigational process is called triangulation and it is the most basic form of locating your position. But when was the last time you navigated around the city with a paper map and a compass? This is the future, and if you are in downtown Chicago and want to get from the ice cream shop to the Adler Planetarium, you whip out your smartphone and ask your favorite Maps program to give you some navigational instruction!

How does your phone know where you are? Your phone has a microchip inside it that uses a network of satellites to locate your position on Earth by figuring out where you are with respect to each satellite. In essence, it is kind of like the triangulation method we just discussed.

Third generation GPS satellite (GPS IIIa).

Third generation GPS satellite (GPS IIIa).

The Global Positioning System satellite network is a constellation of 32 satellites orbiting at an altitude of approximately 20,200 km (12,600 mi, almost 50x higher than the International Space Station). Each of the satellites carries on board an accurate atomic clock that is synchronized to all the other satellites. They sit in orbit, and transmit the current time on their clock.  Those signals spread outward from the satellites, and can be detected on the ground by a GPS receiver, like the one in your smartphone.

Each satellite transmits the same signal at the same time. If you are the same distance from two satellites, you get the same signal from both satellites at the same time.  But suppose you are closer to one satellite — then the time you get from one satellite is ahead of the other! The time you receive from each satellite tells you the distance to the satellite (for aficionados: distance is the speed of light multiplied by the time difference between the received satellite time and your clock, if you ignore relativity!) . The exact position of the satellites in their orbits is known, just like the position of Mount Einstein and Mount Newton were known in the map example above. You can triangulate your position from the satellites by simply drawing a big circle around each satellite as big as the separation you figured out from the timing — you are standing where those big circles cross. GPS allows you to exactly pinpoint your location on the surface of the Earth!

GPS satellites broadcast their own time signals which your phone receives on the ground. Above, the "310" time signal from the red satellite is reaching you at the same time as the "309" signal from the blue satellite. This tells your phone is is closer to the red satellite than the blue satellite. The position of the satellites is known, so your phone uses this information to compute the distance to each of the satellites, and triangulates its position.

GPS satellites broadcast their own time signals which your phone receives on the ground. Above, the “310” time signal from the red satellite is reaching you at the same time as the “309” signal from the blue satellite. This tells your phone it is closer to the red satellite than the blue satellite. The position of the satellites is known, so your phone uses this information to compute the distance to each of the satellites, and triangulates its position.

So what does this have to do with general relativity? One of the predictions of general relativity is that massive objects (like the Earth) warp space and time. The warpage of time means that clocks down here on the surface of the Earth (deep down in the gravitational well), tick slower than clocks carried on satellites high above the Earth.

General relativity tells us time moves more slowly deep down in the gravitational well. If you are going to navigate using clock signals from satellites (GPS) you have to account for this!

General relativity tells us time moves more slowly deep down in the gravitational well. If you are going to navigate using clock signals from satellites (GPS) you have to account for this!

Being appropriately skeptical, you should immediately ask “Okay, how much slower?” and once you hear the answer ask “Does that make a difference?” The military commanders in charge of developing GPS in the 1970s famously asked exactly these questions, uncertain that we had to go to all the effort to think about general relativity for navigation by satellite.

The GPS time correction calculation is well understood, and only takes a couple of pages to work out.

The GPS time correction calculation is well understood, and only takes a couple of pages to work out.

The time difference between a clock on the ground and a clock in a GPS satellite due to general relativity warping time is about 1 nanosecond for every two seconds that passes.  What’s a nanosecond? It is one billionth of a second. What kind of error does a nanosecond make? GPS navigation is based on how long it takes radio signals (a form of light) to get from a GPS satellite to you. Light travels about 12 inches in a nanosecond (watch the indefatigable Admiral Grace Hopper explain what a nanosecond is), so for every nanosecond your timing is off, your navigation is off by about 1 foot.  The accumulated error is about 1000 nanoseconds every 30 minutes, amounting to a difference of 1000 feet. This is a substantial difference when you are trying to accurately navigate!

Every satellite in the GPS constellation is constantly in motion, orbiting the Earth once every 12 hours.

Every satellite in the GPS constellation is constantly in motion, orbiting the Earth once every 12 hours.

This is not the only correction that has to be accounted for. The GPS satellites are also moving along their orbits, so there is a speed difference between you and then. One of Einstein’s early discoveries was special relativity which said that moving clocks run slower than clocks that are standing still. So while the warpage of spacetime is making your clock on the ground tick slower than the satellite’s, the satellite’s motion makes its clock tick slower than yours!  These two effects compete against one another, and both must be accounted for. Special relativity means the satellite clock ticks about 0.1 nanoseconds (1 ten-billionth of a second) slower for every second that passes compared to your clock on the ground. On a 30 minute walk then, this produces an error in location of almost 200 feet.

einsteinPocketBoth special and general relativity were discovered in an era where they had little application to everyday life. None-the-less, as the years have worn on clever and industrious scientists and engineers have discovered that they both have important and profound applications. Both special and general relativity have grown into important tools in modern science and technology, with applications in the most unexpected places in our lives. Usually, it is hidden from me and you under the slick veil of marketing and glossy industrial design, but they are there none-the-less.  Just remember this the next time you’re out walking around, using your phone to navigate: there is a whole lot of Einstein in your pocket.

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This post is part of an ongoing series written for the General Relativity Centennial, celebrating 100 years of gravity (1915-2015).  You can find the first post in the series, with links to the successive posts in this series here: http://wp.me/p19G0g-ru.

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One response to “Gravity 5: Putting Einstein in the Navigator’s Seat

  1. This really helped to understand the gravity of the situation when I get lost.

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